Call us at : (312) 291-4648

100% Free Consultation

Follow Us On:

Employment Discrimination

EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION:

Employment discrimination occurs when an employer treats an employee or job applicant differently because of their race, color, gender, religion, national origin, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. Federal, Illinois, and local laws protect employees and job applicants from unfair treatment based on their race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. An employer can violate the law by refusing to hire an applicant because of their race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. An employer can violate the law by making adverse employment decisions such as disciplining or terminating an employee because of their race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. An employer can violate the law by treating employees differently in the terms and conditions of their employment because of their race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. Currently, the Illinois Human Rights Act and various local laws protect job applicants and employees from discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or perceived sexual orientation and marital status.

The issue is always whether the employer’s actions were motivated by discriminatory intent. The employee or job applicant always has the burden of proving that the employer’s adverse employment decision is because of their race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation. The employer’s discriminatory intent can be shown by direct evidence or circumstantial evidence.

The various Federal, Illinois, and local laws limit the time you have to file employment discrimination claims against an employer. The time limitations for filing claims of employment discrimination vary greatly depending on the type of discrimination alleged to have occurred and the employer involved. If you believe you were subjected to illegal employment discrimination by an employer seek the advice of an attorney immediately. Generally, you are required to file a Charge of Discrimination with a governmental agency such as the EEOC and/or the Illinois Department of Human Rights within 180 days of the adverse employment action.

If you believe that you are a victim of discrimination because of your race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and/or sexual orientation contact Brian J. Graber, Ltd., at (312) 291-4648 for a free consultation.

RETALIATION:

An employer can violate Federal, Illinois, and local laws by retaliating against a person because he or she opposed what he or she reasonably and in good faith believes to be unlawful discrimination based on race, color, gender, national origin, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, marital status, and/or sexual orientation. This also includes harassment based on the same protected categories, such as sexual or racial harassment. An employer can violate Federal, Illinois, and local laws by retaliating against a person because he or she filed a Charge of Discrimination, made an internal complaint of discrimination to the employer, or otherwise testified, assisted, or participated in any investigation conducted by the employer or a governmental agency or a court. An employer cannot retaliate against an employee who provides truthful information of unlawful discrimination and/or harassment going on in the workplace to the employer in an internal investigation and/or a governmental agency investigating another employee’s claim of discrimination and/or harassment. An employer cannot force an employee to provide false evidence or testimony against an employee claiming unlawful discrimination and/or harassment.

The various Federal, Illinois, and local laws limit the time you have to make a claim against an employer for retaliation. The time limits vary depending on the type of law alleged to have been violated and the type of employer involved. Generally, you must file a Charge of Discrimination against the employer within 180 days of the retaliatory act. If you believe your employer unlawfully retaliated against you in violation of Federal, Illinois, or local law, contact Brian J. Graber, Ltd., at (312) 291-4648 for a free consultation immediately.